Erick Rheam joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about being booked and paid to speak, creating $80k in revenue in 15 months and much more!

126. How to Be Booked and Paid to Speak, with Erick Rheam

Erick Rheam joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about being booked and paid to speak, creating $80k in revenue in 15 months and much more!

Today we’ve got an extra special guest for you: Erick Rheam. Erick is a student of our Booked and Paid to Speak program, and he has been wildly successful in his speaking career since signing up for the course. He joined us in December of 2015 and in the 15 months between then and our recording of this episode, he has made over $80,000 in speaking gigs!

On this episode of The Speaker Lab, Erick joins us to talk about his success and how he decided who to speak to and what to speak about, why it’s important to have a good web site and demo and how he gets referrals.

Because Erick is still relatively new to the speaking world his story is relatable, as his resulting success. You’ll want to tune in to hear more about what’s next for him on episode 126 of The Speaker Lab.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • What was he making in his speaking business before joining Booked and Paid to Speak?
  • Why agreements and contracts have been critical to his financial growth as a speaker.
  • What does Erick say you have to love in order to be a successful speaker?
  • How did he decide what to speak about and who to speak to?
  • Why helping people achieve signficance in their lives also helps you.
  • The four things he’s learned that are critical to running a successful speaking business.
  • What percentage of this business is the grind of pursuing and getting gigs?
  • How he’s preparing to go from his full-time corporate job to speaking full-time.
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “90% of this business is the grind.” – Erick Rheam

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

Josh Drean joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about why and how to use video to grow your speaking career.

125. How to Use Video to Grow Your Speaking Career, with Josh Drean

Josh Drean joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about why and how to use video to grow your speaking career.

As a speaker or an aspiring speaker you know the importance of a demo video. But what about other forms of video content like a YouTube channel or Facebook Live? Could those help you build your speaking career? Absolutely says our guest for this episode! Josh Drean is here to tell us how.

Josh’s primary gig is as a youth motivational speaker but he’s also a father and a part-time student at Harvard University in Boston where he is studying business management. As if that wasn’t enough, he is also a street performer who does almost daily videos for his YouTube channel.

On today’s edition of The Speaker Lab, he shares how to leverage video content as a speaker, how he uses content to get gigs and promote those gigs, as well as what to talk about on your video. His insights on those topics and more will get you off the fence about video and in front of the camera! Hear it here on episode 125 of The Speaker Lab.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • By 2020 what percentage of all content will be video?
  • Your fees are directly proportional to the quality of your what?
  • Why did he start producing videos multiple times a week?
  • Josh explains what vlogging is exactly.
  • Does everyone need to do video?
  • Why and how to work for “celebrity status” online.
  • What is Musically and what will it teach you about connecting with your audience?
  • What is the bare minimum equipment you need to get started creating quality video?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “Video is the now as well as the future.” – Josh Drean

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

Neen James joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about owning your uniqueness, how she did it and why doing so will help you stand out as a speaker.

124. How to Set Yourself Apart as a Speaker, Neen James

Neen James joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about owning your uniqueness, how she did it and why doing so will help you stand out as a speaker.

Have you ever considered that how to set yourself apart as a speaker may be to embrace what is uniquely you? Maybe it’s an accent you have or your above-average height, whatever it is it may be the key to standing out in our crowded speaking marketplace.

On today’s edition of The Speaker Lab, I’ve got a guest who has used her unique voice and stature to create a thriving speaking career. Neen James stands a petite 4’10 (and 1/2!) and hails from Australia. With her tiny height and self-professed Disney princess voice she was told by many no one was going to book her or take her seriously as speaker.

But with her undeniable sass, drive and determination she has proven them wrong! Listen to this episode to hear how she accidentally became a professional speaker, how she pivoted from productivity to her current topic today, and how’s she built her reputation in the corporate business world. You’ll hear that and more on episode 124 of The Speaker Lab.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • What’s the trick to having a successful speaking career?
  • What are “telecoffees” and how did she build her business with them?
  • Why you should audit the things you are good at.
  • What are the things that make us “rememorable”?
  • Why speakers have to establish credibility and do it quickly.
  • How she pivoted from productivity to attention.
  • Can you be a jack of all trades and be successful as a speaker?
  • How can you become a great resource and trusted advisor to your clients?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “You have to leverage your uniqueness.” – Neen James

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

Chris Field joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab for a unique episode: this one on one coaching call covers how to go from unpaid to paid speaking gigs, clarify your audience and much more!

123. How to Go From Unpaid to Paid Speaking Gigs, with Chris Field

Chris Field joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab for a unique episode: this one on one coaching call covers how to go from unpaid to paid speaking gigs, clarify your audience and much more!
Episode 123 of The Speaker Lab is unlike any other episode we’ve done before! In essence today’s show is a one-on-one coaching call I had with a listener who emailed me.

I wanted to share our conversation with you because his story is common: he has done a number of free speaking gigs but wasn’t sure about how to move into the paid realm. He also wasn’t sure how to narrow down his list of potential audiences and topics.

On today’s edition of The Speaker Lab, Chris Field joins me to gain clarity on those topics and more. Listen in to hear his stories (including his run for mayor at the age of 19!), and our brainstorming session on this coaching call. You’ll hear how all of that applies to you wherever you are in your speaking journey on episode 123 of The Speaker Lab.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • How do you know if your speaking plan makes financial sense?
  • Why is the audience you speak to a variable in what you can charge?
  • What are the 5 components of the speaker success roadmap?
  • What are the 7 major industries you can speak to?
  • How to know if you are on the right path, or if you need to pivot.
  • What does integrity have to do with your choice of speaking topics?
  • Why it is ideal that you find something other speakers are already doing.
  • What is the reason organizations ultimately hire someone?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “You can feel purpose in anything you choose to do.” – Chris Field

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

Carrie Wilkerson joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about creating multiple speaking gigs and recurring revenue from one opportunity, her transition from musician to speaker, and much more!

122. How to Turn One Speaking Gig Into Many, with Carrie Wilkerson

Carrie Wilkerson joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about her transition from musician to speaker, and much more!

Buckle up buttercups! We’ve got our sassy friend back in the saddle with us today: Ms. Carrie Wilkerson and she is in rare form on episode 122 of the Speaker Lab. If you missed her previous visit to the show you can listen in here.

I wanted Carrie to return to the show because she’s proven how to turn one speaking gig into many, and I wanted her to share that with you. Specifically on this show she will explain how she creates and structures valuable long-term offerings for her clients, and how she turns those offerings into a consistent monthly revenue stream.

This is one episode you don’t want to miss! Get out your pen and paper and get ready for some actionable insights from the one and only Carrie Wilkerson on episode 122 of The Speaker Lab.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • What is the “hit and run” approach and why doesn’t Carrie like it?
  • What questions does she ask to create a 100% closing rate?
  • At what point does she pitch a package deal to clients?
  • Why serving first is the best approach, and how to do it properly.
  • What are the magic words to use when offering a long-term arrangement?
  • How to add value without offering a discount.
  • What are some of the industries where this works, and where it might not?
  • What does she do to land more referrals?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “You have to do the legwork.” – Carrie Wilkerson

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

John Spence joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about generating referrals, providing value and more.

121. How to Get Repeat Clients and Referrals, with John Spence

John Spence joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about generating referrals, providing value and more.

Would you struggle for five years as a speaker if you knew it was going to pay off? Would you be willing to travel 220 days a year if that’s what it took to one day share the stage with Simon Sinek and Gary Vaynerchuk? That’s exactly what our guest for episode 121 of The Speaker Lab has done and continues to do presently.

John Spence spends anywhere from 170 to 220 days a year giving speeches around the world. He speaks on leadership, high performance teams, culture, strategy, strategic thinking, and business excellence, and has been for 23 years.

His speeches are never canned, each one is unique. That coupled with the tremendous value he brings to every speaking engagement has allowed him to build a business that is based almost entirely on referrals. Today he outlines his strategic approach to generating repeat business and referrals, how he got through the struggle of his first five years and why he enjoys being a road warrior.

On this edition of The Speaker Lab, you’ll also hear how he helps charities rather than giving free speeches. Listen in for that and more from the one and only John Spence.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • What is the one question he asks all of his clients?
  • How does he create a unique topic for every speaking engagement?
  • The three ways he differentiates himself as a speaker.
  • How much of his business has been word of mouth?
  • Does he get nervous when he goes on stage?
  • How long does he talk with each potential client before working with them?
  • Why he refuses to sell from the stage.
  • How he got his foot in the door with companies like Mayo Clinic, Merrill Lynch, and Allstate.
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “I’m there to help as much as I humanly can.” – John Spence

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

39 Things You Need To Know About Me (Grant Baldwin)

Fun fact: there is a ton of information on the internet… seriously. You probably have a few favorite websites you visit on a regular basis, and it can become easy to just read words on a screen and forget that behind the words, there is actually a person communicating to you.

Yes, a real person―no robots involved!

Since I claim to be a real person, I’m going to assume you are one as well. Because of that, I want you to know a bit about who I am.

Some of these things you may already know, but hopefully you will learn a few things that will surprise you!

Here goes, this is the real me (39 facts)!

  1. I’m 35 – In my 20s, people always told me I was older than I looked. Now though, people guess my age a little more accurately, so either I’m catching up or they are getting better. With each birthday, I also compare myself way too much to where other people my age are in life. I shouldn’t worry about it, but I do.
  2. I’m married to my high school sweetheart – I was a pretty big flirt as a teenager but thankfully, I found “the one” early in life. We started dating when I was a 15 year old freshman (she was a 17 year old junior…ahhh yeah :). At the time of this writing, we’ve been together over 18 years (dated 5, married 13). And if you’re doing the math, yes, I got married when I was 20. My wife is amazing. My best friend on the planet. We make a great team. And I’m still ridiculously crazy about her.
  3. My parents are divorced – When I was in middle school, my parents split up. At the time, it really messed with me. I didn’t really know any other parents who were divorced. My wife’s parents also split up while we were dating. Divorce sucks. My wife and I have a really good marriage, but the bottom line is that marriage is still really freaking hard.
  4. I have 3 daughters – As a guy, I actually really wanted a son. I’ve got a great relationship with my dad, so I was hoping to be able to have the same with my own son, but it didn’t happen. And in the end, I couldn’t be happier. I have 3 amazingly awesome daughters (Sydnee is 10, Emilee 8, and Mylee 6) that are each unique and special in their own way. At this point, I don’t think I’d know what to do with a son. I’m having too much fun with my princesses.
  5. I worry about being a good dad – I lucked out in having great parents. I still have a wonderful relationship with both of them. But I really enjoy my work so I often fear I spend more time on it than I should and not enough time with my daughters.
  6. I’m the oldest of three – I have a younger brother and sister who are both super cool. We’re each very different and yet very similar in a lot of ways. My brother moved to New York City several years ago and has built a career in the tech space. He currently works for Buzzfeed and is crushing it. He is also gay. He came out several years ago and at the time, it really messed with me. I’ve come a long way though in learning to accept and love him for him. I have a younger sister who is a successful graphic designer (she designs literally all my stuff). She is super talented. She has a little girl (2 years old) named Penelope (we call her Poppi) who is adorable. I’ve got cool siblings.
  7. I went to Bible college (and part of me regrets it) – I always wanted to be a youth pastor, so Bible college was the next logical step. But to be honest, I was really involved in my church and felt like I learned a lot more there than sitting in a classroom. I do have a bachelor’s degree, but it has little to do with the work I’m doing now. As my own kids get older, I wrestle with the value of college.
  8. I used to be a youth pastor – My youth pastor had a big impact on my life, so I wanted to do the same. Working in a church though is actually really hard. I got a glimpse of how the sausage is made, and it’s not always pretty. However, my youth pastor experience (although not always positive) really helped shape what I do today.
  9. I’m a Christian – I grew up in church and being from the midwest, I’m in the heart of the Bible belt. I think my faith has evolved and grown over the years, but I still believe in Jesus and make an effort to follow Him with my life.
  10. I’m a huge St. Louis Cardinals fan – Growing up in Missouri, you pretty much are born a Cards fan. In 2011, I went to Game 7 with my dad to see them win the World Series. Huge life highlight. Here’s my reaction to watching Game 6 of that series…
  11. I can be a really big jerk sometimes – Generally I think I’m fairly nice. But sometimes I know I can be a jerk. Sometimes I blow people off or get frustrated at someone even though the issue may not be their fault. Ugh.
  12. I don’t drink – Like I mentioned, I grew up in a fairly conservative world, so drinking was always a bit taboo. But as an adult, although I’ve become a bit more tolerant of it, I’m just not a fan. I don’t like the taste, and it generally doesn’t have a positive affect on people. And it’s expensive, and I’m cheap.
  13. I’m frugal/thrifty/cheap – Even though we make a decent living, I’m still pretty frugal/thrifty/cheap. I hate wasting money. It was only recently that my wife and I started getting our own drinks at restaurants and not secretly sharing one. Baby steps, people.
  14. I worry a lot about failing – I’m fairly confident in my abilities, but I also worry that at any moment it could all come crumbling down. I want to think my business is stable and secure, but I also feel like it’s a house of cards at times.
  15. I had an eBay business selling purses – Years ago my wife and I started dabbling in eBay and somehow started selling high end, name brand purses. We shipped things all over the world. It was pretty cool. At one time, I knew a lot about Coach handbags. Don’t judge.
  16. I spend too much time comparing myself to others – I want to be successful. I’m pretty motivated and driven. There’s no real metric to know if you’re doing good or not, so I often look to my left and right to see how I stack up against my peers. It’s not a fair measurement for them or me, but I still find myself doing it.
  17. I’ve been to 48 states but very little travel outside the US – Maine and South Carolina. Those are the two I’m missing. But for all the travel I’ve done, it’s limited to just North and Central America.
  18. I still get nervous before speaking – I get that question a lot. I’m usually nervous for the first few seconds. Those first few moments on stage tell me how the rest of the talk will go.
  19. I’m an introvert – I prefer being by myself. When I travel, I don’t want to interact with people. I keep my head down and headphones on. When I’m home, I’m almost always with family. I’m not really a social person.
  20. I’m not very compassionate – I generally think most issues in life are caused by our own decisions (both good and bad). Because of that, I know I’m not really sympathetic or compassionate to people. If you don’t like your life, then fix it. I should probably loosen up a bit on that stance.
  21. I can be arrogant – I have moments when I think I’m better than other people. It’s stupid and childish and dumb, but I still catch myself doing it sometimes.
  22. My wife and I are debt free – We had about $30k in debt when we got married. When we were in our early 20s, we finally got serious and intentional about our money and paid off all our debt in two years. Today, we still live on a budget and remain debt free (other than a mortgage on our house). Being debt free has allowed us more options and freedom in our life than just about anything else we’ve done.
  23. We homeschool our kids – At the time of this writing, this is our 4th year doing the homeschool thing. Truthfully, my wife does 99% of it. I’m just the awkward PE teacher who flirts with the principal way too much. We started homeschooling so we could spend more time with our kids. We think the school system is pretty broken, and we could do just as good if not better. Homeschooling is a lot of work, but it’s been incredibly rewarding for our family.
  24. I keep a bucket list – I have a written bucket list that is currently at about 50 things I want to do before I die. I’ve accomplished about 11 of them so far. I know of 2 (maybe 3) more I’ll check off this year.
  25. I don’t enjoy writing – Writing doesn’t come easy to me. It’s a lot of work. But I see the value in it, so I try to do it. Writing helps me process and think things through.
  26. I like doing puzzles – I like the challenge of them. And I’m introverted, so this works well for me. You can see my Instagram feed for a bunch I’ve done.
  27. I’m not a workaholic, but I work a lot – There are days that it’s just work, but for the most part, I really enjoy what I do. I try to find a good balance between being a good husband and father but also hustling to provide a great life for my family. Some days I do find that balance. Other days, I work way too much.
  28. I’ve done several endurance races – I’ve finished 2 marathons, 6 half marathons, and 4 triathlons. I’m not fast at all, but I like the sense of accomplishment. And they’re bucket list items.
  29. I know very little about investing – I like to think I’m fairly smart, but I know little about investing. I understand the general idea of how it works, but there’s a bunch of seemingly basic stuff I just don’t get.
  30. I don’t read as much as I should – I go through spurts where I may read a bunch and times I may read very little. Last year, I probably read 5 books. Less than a month into this year, I’ve already finished 2, so we’re on a good track now.
  31. I’ve had the same haircut since 3rd grade – My mom let me shave my head in elementary, and I’ve just always had that haircut. It’s so much simpler than having to fix my hair everyday. Plus, I don’t think I’ve ever paid for a haircut. Like literally ever. It’s always been done by my mom or my wife.
  32. I’m not real patient (I hate crowds and long lines) – When I get impatient, the jerk part of me likes to come out. Whether it be at an airport or amusement park, I hate crowds and long lines.
  33. I’m scared of snakes – I can tolerate spiders, but snakes creep me out.
  34. Politics are uninteresting to me – It’s all so dumb to me. I think what a few big wigs in Washington decide has little effect on my life, so I generally don’t pay much attention to it.
  35. I enjoy travel hacking – Between my wife and I, we have 51 different accounts for airline, hotel, and credit card reward points. Combined, we have over 2 million miles and points for travel. I told you I’m cheap.
  36. I want to have a model train set someday – I don’t know why, but I’ve always thought model train sets are so cool. I want to build one someday.
  37. I’m confident I’ll be successful – I’ve always felt like I would be successful. I don’t know if that’s confidence or arrogance or just being naive, but I really feel like if I just keep hustling and working hard, I’ll be successful.
  38. I eat way too much sugar – I’ve got a ridiculous sweet tooth. It’s not healthy. Sometimes I worry it’ll really affect me in life.
  39. I want you to like me – Like most, I’m a people-pleaser. I want you to like me. I want you to be impressed by me. I want you to think I’m somebody. If I get 99 nice emails but one negative one, I’ll beat myself up over the one.

Alright, that’s enough confession for now… Maybe you can identify with some of those quirks and insecurities. Maybe they help you see you’re not alone.

So that’s me. What about you? I’d love to hear a fun, random fact about you. Leave it in the comments below or click here to email me. I’d love to hear from you!


Thanks to my friends Corbett Barr and Omar Zenhom for their own posts that inspired this one.

Hugh Culver joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about how to make your speech memorable, the 5 things you need to do that and much more!

120. How to Give a Truly Memorable Speech, with Hugh Culver

Hugh Culver joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about how to make your speech memorable, the 5 things you need to do that and much more!

What makes a speech a memorable one? Our guest for today knows! He says there are 5 keys you must include to make your speech memorable. Joining us for episode 120 is our repeat visitor and friend, Hugh Culver.

He was previously here for episode 10, which feels like an eternity ago! If you missed his first visit, Hugh is an adventurer turned speaker. He started out in the adventure travel industry and later became a speaker. For the last dozen years or so, he’s been speaking to corporate audiences about productivity.

On today’s show, Hugh tells us about the 5 things he’s learned along the way that are needed to give a memorable speech. They are: solve a problem, warm up the audience, make the audience work, teach with stories and make your speech about them. Listen in for that and more on episode 119 of The Speaker Lab!

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • Why is your speech your best marketing tool?
  • What type of speeches don’t pay and how can you avoid giving them?
  • What are the variables that go into making a good presentation?
  • Why it’s okay to speak on a competitive topic.
  • Two tricks to find out what topics people are being paid to speak about.
  • The three phases of warming up an audience.
  • Why should you make your audience work during your speech?
  • What does it mean to be “situationally extroverted” and why does it matter?
  • The quick check to ensure you are making your speech about your audience.
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “One speech should lead to more speeches.” – Hugh Culver

EPISODE RESOURCES

Mike Michalowicz joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about what to do if your name is hard to pronounce, leveling up as you grow your speaking career and much more!

119. How to Start Over as a Speaker and Author, with Mike Michalowicz

Mike Michalowicz joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about what to do if your name is hard to pronounce, leveling up as you grow your speaking career and much more!

If you built several successful businesses and sold them, what would you do next? Would you write books and become a speaker? That’s what our guest for today’s episode of The Speaker Lab has done!

Mike Michalowicz (listen in and he’ll help you pronounce his name) is a well-known international speaker and best-selling author who made a lot of money in previous endeavors, and started over as a speaker and author.

On episode 119 of The Speaker Lab, he shares why he has gone down this particular road and several hacks that have helped him continue to level up his success. We also discuss  how to pronounce his name and why his web site makes fun of the various mispronunciations he’s heard over the years, how much of his time is devoted to speaking versus writing and so much more on today’s show!

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • What is a domain name hack you can use if your name is hard to spell and pronounce?
  • What should you do with your biggest weakness?
  • Why he became an author and speaker when he started over.
  • What are the strongest domains and how can you get backlinks from them?
  • Where do you get the best practice as a speaker?
  • How he made the transition from college speaker to the corporate realm.
  • How did he nearly double his speaking frequency?
  • What introduction did Simon Sinek make for Mike?
  • What is realistic and unrealistic to expect when working with an agent or an agency?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “The hustle doesn’t stop.” – Mike Michalowicz

 

EPISODE RESOURCES

118. The In’s And Out’s of TED/TEDx And How To Speak At One Of Their Events, with Tamsen Webster

Tamsen Webster joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to discuss TED Talks, TEDx Talks, and more!

Is giving a TED Talk or a TEDx Talk on your bucket list? If it is then today is your lucky day! Joining us for this episode of The Speaker Lab is Tamsen Webster. Tamsen is a keynote business speaker and strategist who helps people find the power of their ideas and share those ideas with the world.

She also happens to be the Executive Producer of TEDx Cambridge, the oldest TEDx in the country. In her role, she decides who speaks at their events and she oversees all coaching and designs the coaching process for those speakers.

On this episode of The Speaker Lab, she shares the differences between TED and TEDx Talks and why giving either one is a great feather in anyone’s cap. She tells us how she helps her speakers prepare for their TEDx talks, how you can get your foot in the door with your local TEDx and how to know if your idea is interesting enough to be considered for a TEDx talk. Listen in for that and more on the 118th edition of The Speaker Lab!

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • What is the oldest TEDx in the country?
  • What are the differences between a Ted talk and a TEDx talk?
  • How to get your foot in the door at your local TEDx.
  • Why it’s always helpful to know the organizers of any event.
  • What are the two different levels of licensing for TEDx events, and why do they matter?
  • Why do professional speakers have an extra barrier to being accepted as a TEDx speaker?
  • What are the three “I”s of a great TED Talk?
  • What gets in the way of connecting with the audience in Tamsen’s experience?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: “We want the new idea before it’s out there.” – Tamsen Webster

 

EPISODE RESOURCES