077. How to Be Yourself on Stage With Scott Stratten

podcast episodes

Scott Stratten joins Grant Baldwin on The Speaker Lab to talk about leveling up your speaking career, and much more!

Today Scott Stratten is a world-renowned keynote speaker, best-selling author and all-around awesome guy who is known by nearly everyone in the speaking community.

But did you know that in the early days of his career he flew around North America training people to sell bubble wrap?! As our guest on episode 77 of The Speaker Lab, he shares that amazing story, and much more.

Scott also shares his earliest experiences as a corporate trainer after college, and why he chose that path. He explains the origin story of the video that catapulted him to speaker stardom and led to receiving 97 speaker invitations in two weeks!

Whether or not you ever create a viral video to aid your speaking career, Scott gives specific suggestions on how to get your start on this episode. We go into the how and when of leveling up your speaking career, once you’ve got your feet wet as a speaker. He is equal parts hilarious and wise today! Listen in to laugh along with us, and get a little wiser on episode 77 of The Speaker Lab.

THE FINER DETAILS OF THIS SHOW:   

  • Are many keynote speakers introverted or extroverted?
  • Why he has hired for his weaknesses.
  • Should every person you bring on to your team be an extension of you?
  • The importance of having tact and empathy, no matter what happens.
  • What are his two demands he includes in every contract?
  • What is his biggest fear as a speaker?
  • Why you must “show your work” before you can increase your fees.
  • What two things will all speakers eventually learn firsthand?
  • And so much more!

Tweetable: It’s a fine line between ego and confidence.   Scott Stratten

EPISODE RESOURCES

  • Such a great episode! Never had the chance to hear him live, but Scott is the real deal. Really appreciated his thoughts about not apologizing for feeling sick or a talk getting cut short. It doesn’t serve the audience and makes them feel like they’re missing out. I think the same thing applies to podcast episodes. Don’t apologize for the audio or let the listener know content got cut for a technical reason. Whenever a host does that at the beginning of an episode, I skip it. Doesn’t matter if it’s my favorite show or not.